Monthly Archives: June 2017

Top Reasons to Become a Catechist

Loyola Press has some great articles on recruiting.  Here is one that states the Top Reasons to Become a Catechist.  http://catechistsjourney.loyolapress.com/2007/06/top-reasons-to-become-a-catechist/

Top Reasons to Become a Catechist

At this time of the year, many Catholics find themselves considering an invitation to become a catechist in their parish. Directors/Coordinators of Religious Education/Faith Formation, Pastoral Associates, Priests, and Deacons are all “on the prowl” seeking out those who have the potential to serve in this role. Perhaps you’ve been invited to be a catechist. Perhaps you know someone who is thinking about becoming a catechist. Or perhaps you are the one doing the inviting. Whatever the case may be, I offer the following reasons for becoming a catechist.

Top Reasons to Become a Catechist

  1. You will grow in your own faith, learn the teachings of the Church, and deepen your relationship with Jesus.
  2. Your Baptism calls you to share in Jesus’ ministry.
  3. Children, teens, and adults in today’s world, more than ever, need to hear the Good News of Jesus.
  4. Children, teens, and adults in today’s world, more than ever, need to encounter good role models of faith.
  5. You have much to share with those you’ll teach, and you’ll have opportunities to share faith with other catechists.
  6. Today’s catechetical textbooks/resources offer outstanding support.
  7. You’ll be challenged, you’ll have fun, and you’ll make new friends.
  8. You’ll be helping people deepen their relationship with Jesus. (You’ll be evangelizing!)
  9. You’ll be handing on a 2000-year-old Tradition that changes lives.
  10. It’s our job: Jesus sent us to “go and teach all nations.”

What other reasons would you include?

P.S. If you are considering the invitation to serve as a catechist, please send a comment to my blog and tell me (us, i.e. other catechists) what you’re thinking or ask any questions that you may have. There are lots of great catechists out there who would love to share their thoughts with you about this wonderful opportunity!

About Joe Paprocki  2139 Articles
Joe Paprocki, DMin, is National Consultant for Faith Formation at Loyola Press. He has more than 30 years of experience in ministry and has taught at many different levels. He is the author of numerous books, including the bestseller The Catechist’s Toolbox and Under the Influence of Jesus.

What is the Convocation of Catholic Leaders?

This summer, the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops will be convening an unprecedented gathering of key leaders from dioceses and Catholic organizations from all across the country in order to assess the challenges and opportunities of our time, particularly in the context of the Church in the United States. This has been an ongoing initiative of the Bishops’ Working Group on the Life and Dignity of the Human Person. The gathering will assemble Catholic leaders for a strategic conversation, under the leadership of the bishops, on forming . . .http://www.usccb.org/issues-and-action/get-involved/meetings-and-events/usccb-convocation-2017.cfm

Q & A with Bishop Frank Dewane: The Moral Imperative of Budget Spending Priorities

“We cannot balance the budget on the backs of the poor.”

To read the article go to: http://www.usccb.org/about/public-affairs/experts/qa-budget-bishop-dewane.cfm

Earlier today, President Trump unveiled a budget plan that calls for a sharp increase in military and immigration enforcement spending and stark cuts across much of the rest of the government including the elimination of dozens of long-standing federal programs that assist the poor and most vulnerable among us.

President Trump’s first budget proposal, named “A New Foundation for American Greatness,” would increase defense spending by $54 billion and then offset that by stripping money from many agencies and programs that serve millions of people, including the poor.

The cuts could represent the widest swath of reductions in federal programs since the drawdown after World War II.  Bishop Frank Dewane of Venice, Florida, Chairman of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops Committee on Domestic Justice and Human Development, emphasizes the moral imperatives involved in such decisions and expresses concerns about their impact on the nation’s poor and vulnerable in the following Q & A:

Q: Why does the Catholic Church consider the budget a moral document?

A:   The budget is a moral document because it highlights the collective spending priorities of our nation, which impact the good of real people.  These decisions help determine how we all, particularly the most vulnerable, will fare in society.  As Christians, we also recall the words of Christ who said, “whatever you did for one of the least of these, you did for Me” (Matthew 25).  Budget decisions ought to be guided by the moral criteria that ensure protection of human life and dignity, give central importance to “the least of these,” and promote the well-being of workers and families who struggle to live in dignity.  We cannot balance the budget on the backs of the poor.  The moral measure of the federal budget is how well it promotes the common good of all, especially the most vulnerable.

“We cannot balance the budget on the backs of the poor.”

Q: What are some of your concerns with the proposed budget?

A:  The proposed sharp increases in defense and immigration enforcement spending, coupled with severe reductions to non-defense spending for the poor, is profoundly troubling.  Such spending reductions would have an impact on the vulnerable in every state. Crucial programs, such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), which provides critical nutrition assistance to hungry people, would suffer from deep cuts, and the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, which gives states and cities more flexibility in how they combat poverty, could be eliminated.  When defense spending, which already exceeds that of the next eight nations combined, is receiving a large increase in funds, it is hard to reconcile the significant cuts that are being made to crucial services such as health care, nutrition, income security and anti-poverty programs.

Q: How does the federal budget impact the Catholic Church in America?

A:  The Catholic community defends the unborn and the undocumented, feeds the hungry, shelters the homeless, educates the young, and cares for the sick both at home and abroad.  We help mothers facing challenging situations of pregnancy, poor families striving to rise above crushing poverty, refugees fleeing conflict and persecution, and communities devastated by wars, natural disasters and famines. In much of this work, Catholics are partners with the government.  Combined resources allow our nation to reach further and help more. The human consequences of budget choices are clear to us as pastors, and it is important to be vocal when proposed funding cuts impact those whose voices are all too often missing from these debates. Therefore, the Catholic Bishops of the United States stand ready to work with leaders of both parties toward a federal budget that will not only reduce future deficits, but will also protect the poor and vulnerable while advancing peace and the common good of civil society.

Support the Fortnight for Freedom 2017

To learn more about how you can join in prayer to protect and preserve our religious freedom read the corresponding article in the June 13th edition of the Catholic Herald on page 2 or go  to:  http://www.archgh.org/resources/fortnight-for-freedom/

 

Saint Boniface Saint of the Day for June 5

St. Boniface’s story can be found at https://www.franciscanmedia.org/saint-boniface/

Prayer of St. Boniface

Eternal God, the refuge and help of all your children,
we praise you for all you have given us,
for all you have done for us,
for all that you are to us.
In our weakness, you are strength,
in our darkness, you are light,
in our sorrow, you are comfort and peace.
We cannot number your blessings,
we cannot declare your love:
For all your blessings we bless you.
May we live as in your presence,
and love the things that you love,
and serve you in our daily lives;
through Jesus Christ our Lord.