Author Archives: Debbie Jones

Dates to Remember

Many of you are planning next year’s calendar.  Please add these dates to your calendar:

July 24-29, 2017    Basic Formation for Catechetical Formation (BFCL)

August 22, 2017     Genesis

September 30, 2017     Festival of Modules

November 14, 2017     Professional Growth Day

December 5, 2017     Certificate Ceremony

January 20, 2018     Module Workshops

February 1 & 2, 2018     Catechetical Retreat

March  14, 2018     Module Facilitator Training

April 16 & 17, 2018     Mentor Training

June 11-15, 2018     Catechetical Summer Intensive

 

 

Pope, Coptic patriarch honor martyrs, urge unity for peace

Pope Francis, accompanied by Coptic Orthodox Pope Tawadros II, lights a candle outside St. Peter’s Church in Cairo April 28. The pope lit the candle in remembrance of victims of a December 2016 bombing inside the church. (CNS photo/Paul Haring) See POPE-EGYPT-ORTHODOX April 28, 2017.

For more information go to:  http://www.catholicnews.com/services/englishnews/2017/pope-coptic-patriarch-honor-martyrs-urge-unity-for-peace.cfm

2017 National Conference for Catechetical Leadership

Register today!  Presenters:  Fr. Ron Rolheiser, Sr. Lynn Levo, Robert Wicks, Sr. M. Johanna Paruch, Hoffsman Ospino, Sr. Theresa Rickard, Mike Patin, Jack Jezreel, and Aida Hildago.  To find out more information or to register go to:  https://www.nccl.org/conference-2017/

 

Next Sunday is Palm Sunday

Next Sunday, Palm Sunday, begins our Holy Week.  This history of Palm Sunday is very interesting.

“Library : History of Palm Sunday | Catholic Culture

As soon as the Church obtained her freedom in the fourth century, the faithful in Jerusalem re-enacted the solemn entry of Christ into their city on the Sunday before Easter, holding a procession in which they carried branches and sang the Hosanna (Matthew 21, 1-11). In the early Latin Church, people attending Mass on this Sunday would hold aloft twigs of olives, which were not, however, blessed in those days.”  To read more, go to:  https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/library/view.cfm?recnum=105

 

St. Joseph Pray For Us.

ST. JOSEPH NOVENA PRAYERS

Saint Joseph, you are the faithful protector and intercessor of all who love and venerate you. You know that I have confidence in you and that, after Jesus and Mary, I come to you as an example for holiness, for you are especially close with God. Therefore, I humbly commend myself, with all who are dear to me and all that belong to me, to your intercession. I beg of you, by your love for Jesus and Mary, not to abandon me during life and to assist me at the hour of my death.

Find the Original Here: http://www.praymorenovenas.com/st-joseph-novena/#ixzz4bEyPtPu1

The Story Behind St. Joseph’s Altar

(Taken from https://www.catholicculture.org/culture/liturgicalyear/activities/view.cfm?id=1029)

The St. Joseph Altar or St. Joseph Table is an old tradition from Sicily. Here is the explanation of how the tradition started.

The people of Sicily prayed. For too long there had been no rain to nourish the crops that sustained life for most of the island.

The dried out wheat stalks cracked beneath the feet of the poor farmers as they walked through their barren fields. Only a sea of dust and withered vines remained from what had once been row upon row of brightly colored fruits and vegetables.

And so the people prayed.

They pleaded to St. Joseph, their patron, for relief from the famine that gripped the island. At last the skies opened, sending down the life-giving water. The people rejoiced. Some time later, to show their gratitude, they prepared a table with a special assortment of foods they had harvested. After paying honor to St. Joseph, they distributed the food to the less fortunate.

The first St. Joseph Altar set up on the Island of Sicily was a small one, of course. But as time went on and the tradition took hold, the flamboyant nature and creative spirit of the Italians caused the altars to grow larger and more ornate.

Today, the artistic quality of the breads, cookies and pastries, which are baked in such shapes as chalices, staffs and pyramids, often rivals the exquisite flavor of the food offerings.

Though Sicilian immigrants introduced the custom to America, the celebration is not confined to any nationality. Rather, it has become a public event which its devoted participants embrace for a host of private and personal reasons. The feast is alternately a source of petition and thanksgiving.