Tag Archives: Bible

Prepare for the Second Sunday of Advent

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Deepen you understanding of scripture during Advent with the USCCB’s guides for “divine reading.” Taken from the USCCB website:

“Lectio divina is a form of meditation rooted in liturgical celebration that dates back to early monastic communities. It was a method practiced by monks in their daily encounter with Scripture, both as they prepared for the Eucharist and as they prayed the Liturgy of the Hours.

The Latin phrase “lectio divina” may be translated as “divine reading.”  As one reads and invites the Word to become a transforming lens that brings the events of daily living into focus, one can come to live more deeply and find the presence of God more readily in the events of each day. The method of lectio divina follows four steps:

  • lectio (reading)
  • meditatio (meditation)
  • contemplatio (contemplation)
  • and oratio (prayer).”

Go to the USCCB’s website to use their Lectio Divina guides to meditate, contemplate, and pray on your spiritual preparation for Advent and Christmas.  http://www.usccb.org/prayer-and-worship/liturgical-year/advent/lectio-divina-for-advent.cfm

Lectio Divina for the Second Sunday of Advent   en Español

 

Understanding the Bible

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By Mary Elizabeth Sperry,
Associate Director for Utilization of the New American Bible.

The Bible is all around us. People hear Scripture readings in church. We have Good Samaritan (Luke 10) laws, welcome home the Prodigal Son (Luke 15), and look for the Promised Land (Exodus 3, Hebrews 11). Some biblical passages have become popular maxims, such as “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you (Matthew 7:12),” “Thou shalt not steal (Exodus 20:15), and “love thy neighbor” (Matthew 22:39).

Today’s Catholic is called to take an intelligent, spiritual approach to the bible.

Listed here are 10 points for fruitful Scripture reading.

  1. Bible reading is for Catholics. The Church encourages Catholics to make reading the Bible part of their daily prayer lives. Reading these inspired words, people grow deeper in their relationship with God and come to understand their place in the community God has called them to in himself.
  1. Prayer is the beginning and the end. Reading the Bible is not like reading a novel or a history book. It should begin with a prayer asking the Holy Spirit to open our hearts and minds to the Word of God. Scripture reading should end with a prayer that this Word will bear fruit in our lives, helping us to become holier and more faithful people.
  1. Get the whole story! When selecting a Bible, look for a Catholic edition. A Catholic edition will include the Church’s complete list of sacred books along with introductions and notes for understanding the text. A Catholic edition will have an imprimatur notice on the back of the title page. An imprimatur indicates that the book is free of errors in Catholic doctrine.
  1. The Bible isn’t a book. It’s a library. The Bible is a collection of 73 books written over the course of many centuries. The books include royal history, prophecy, poetry, challenging letters to struggling new faith communities, and believers’ accounts of the preaching and passion of Jesus. Knowing the genre of the book you are reading will help you understand the literary tools the author is using and the meaning the author is trying to convey.
  1. Know what the Bible is – and what it isn’t. The Bible is the story of God’s relationship with the people he has called to himself. It is not intended to be read as history text, a science book, or a political manifesto. In the Bible, God teaches us the truths that we need for the sake of our salvation.
  1. The sum is greater than the parts. Read the Bible in context. What happens before and after – even in other books – helps us to understand the true meaning of the text.
  1. The Old relates to the New. The Old Testament and the New Testament shed light on each other. While we read the Old Testament in light of the death and resurrection of Jesus, it has its own value as well. Together, these testaments help us to understand God’s plan for human beings.
  1. You do not read alone. By reading and reflecting on Sacred Scripture, Catholics join those faithful men and women who have taken God’s Word to heart and put it into practice in their lives. We read the Bible within the tradition of the Church to benefit from the holiness and wisdom of all the faithful.
  1. What is God saying to me? The Bible is not addressed only to long-dead people in a faraway land. It is addressed to each of us in our own unique situations. When we read, we need to understand what the text says and how the faithful have understood its meaning in the past. In light of this understanding, we then ask: What is God saying to me?
  1. Reading isn’t enough. If Scripture remains just words on a page, our work is not done. We need to meditate on the message and put it into action in our lives. Only then can the word be “living and effective.”(Hebrews 4:12).

Can be found on the USCCB website at http://www.usccb.org/bible/understanding-the-bible/index.cfm

Learn Lectio Divina

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This is a great introduction video to Lectio Divina by Paulist Evangelization Ministries.  If you have never prayed Lectio Divina or if you know someone who would like to learn, go to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7M9k6m9Gewo

 

Jeff Cavins presents Put Yourself Into The Story!

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Jeff Cavins will be at St. John Vianney on October 2nd and 3rd (Friday and Saturday). Cost is $40 (covers both presentations, lunch on Saturday, receptions and study materials).  Child Care is available.  For more information email Yvonne at ygill@stjohnvianney.org. Space is limited, for reservation call 281-584-2022.